The sentence

You may be worried by the shape and form of this blog post but it will be explained and if it is all too much for you there are safer structures below but I why not give it a go and see what happens I am blessed or cursed to be interested in many things too many things this means that I know very little about a large number of things this allows me to be part of many conversations but for my contribution to be best if it is questions rather than answers as I have become older I take fewer opportunities to get away with it as my drunken and failed attempt to feign knowledge of orthogonal with David McAlmont demonstrates danger lies in pretending to know but if you give up the pretence you may find yourself being taking around a national gallery learning something
the disadvantage of being interested in too many things is that you will never be an expert on anything, the advantage is you may get asked to do lots of interesting things I get the chance to get involved in events of art science religion music and shamanism tonight was probably art and shamanism I was involved in a four hour no break nine performers reading of a monologue novella without punctuation the Sentence is a science fiction story that also goes deeply into the life and mind of a human who feels forced into crime by circumstance it is written by Alistair Fruish who has a deep knowledge of imaginative fiction and also works with prisoners and in prisonsthis reading at the Cockpit Theatre was put on by Daisy Eris who is also behind Cosmic Trigger the Play based on the life of Robert Anton Wilson the readers sat in a row and there was a spare seat for any audience member that might like to come and read a page or two a reader would start and after a few pages Daisy would make a signal and someone else would put up their arm and take over this risky endeavour meant looking up from your own copy so once you had the nod you may have lost your place there was a small time of overlapped reading to ensure we were all on the same page it is an interesting task to find meaning in something without punctuation to something that had removed some of the clues of sentiment and something that you have not read most of this was an alien text and the author had removed many of the clues. It could become a spell or it could become a drone I kept Beckett’s Not I in my head I was also aware that I was not permitted to turn to any props in terms of off script jokes or nods to the audience If I fucked up I had to find a way of getting out of it that was in the text when an audience member wanted to go to the bar toilet or for a cigarette break a reader would go with each one so they would not miss any words being unable to look up from the script I nearly walked all the way into the toilet cubicle with one woman at one point of maximum loo break there were only two readers left on stage as the evening wore on some readers felt comfortable adding punctuation while others found new ways to keep the flow constant while not becoming meaningless one audience reader added a lot of swearing I wondered what meaning each audience member got from the event as I imagined it would be more disparate than usual did it matter that some of us read smell instead of smell dropped nots and lost the negativity of patches of pages sadly, for purposes of a breakfast interview with an Australian I had to leave early so could not take part in the boozy post show dissection I am glad that the minds that made this exist on this rare occasion I did not then sit on the bus and wonder what I did wrong i happened I was part of it immersed in it whether attempting to read while going up stairs losing and finding places seeking meaning in the word as the word itself came out there was barely any time for my homunculus of criticism to pipe up I hope I have left him there I imagine not the sentence is available from lepus books and Cosmic Trigger the Play is coming to the cockpit book shambles podcast has recent interviews with Alan Moore Noel Fielding and Philip Ridley.

OR

I am blessed or cursed to be interested in many things.
Too many things.
This means that I know very little about a large number of things.
This allows me to be part of many conversations, but for my contribution to be best if it is questions rather than answers.
As I have become older, I take fewer opportunities to “get away with it”. As my drunken and failed attempt to feign knowledge of “orthogonal” with David McAlmont, danger lies in pretending to know, but if you give up the pretence, you may find yourself being taking around a national gallery learning something.
The disadvantage of being interested in too many things is that you will never be an expert on anything, the advantage is, you may get asked to do lots of interesting things. I get the chance to get involved in events of art, science, religion, music and shamanism.
Tonight was probably art and shamanism.
I was involved in a four hour, no break, nine performers, reading of a monologue novella without punctuation. The Sentence is a science fiction story that also goes deeply into the life and mind of a human who feels forced into crime by circumstance. It is written by Alistair Fruish who has a deep knowledge of imaginative fiction and also works with prisoners and in prisons.
This reading at The Cockpit Theatre was put on by Daisy Eris, who is also behind Cosmic Trigger the Play, based on the life of Robert Anton Wilson.

The readers sat in a row and there was a spare seat for any audience member that might like to come and read a page or two. A reader would start and, after a few pages, Daisy would make a signal, and someone else would put up their arm and take over. This risky endeavour meant looking up from your own copy so, once you had the nod, you may have lost your place. There was a small time of overlapped reading to ensure we were all on the same page.

It is an interesting task to find meaning in something without punctuation, to something that had removed some of the clues of sentiment, and something that you have not read most of. This was an alien text and the author had removed many of the clues. It could become a spell or it could become a drone. I kept Beckett’s Not I in my head.

I was also aware that I was not permitted to turn to any props in terms of off script jokes or nods to the audience. If I fucked up, I had to find a way of getting out of it that was in the text.

When an audience member wanted to go to the bar, toilet or for a cigarette break, a reader would go with each one, so they would not miss any words. Being unable to look up from the script, I nearly walked all the way into the cubicle with one woman. At one point of maximum loo break, there were only two readers left on stage.

As the evening wore on, some readers felt comfortable adding punctuation, while others found new ways to keep the flow constant, while not becoming meaningless.
One audience reader added a lot of swearing.
I wondered what meaning each audience member got from the event as I imagined it would be more disparate than usual. Did it matter that some of us read “smell” instead of “smell”, dropped “not”s and lost the negativity of patches of pages?

Sadly, for purposes of a breakfast interview with an Australian, I had to leave early, so could not take part in the boozy,post show dissection. I am glad that the minds that made this exist. On this rare occasion, I did not then sit on the bus and wonder what I did wrong. It happened. I was part of it. Immersed in it, whether attempting to read while going up stairs, losing and finding places, seeking meaning in a word as the word itself came out, there was barely any time for my homunculus of criticism to pipe up. I hope I have left him there, I imagine not.

the sentence is available from lepus books

Cosmic Trigger the Play is coming to The Cockpit

Book Shambles podcast has recent interviews with Alan Moore Noel Fielding and Philip Ridley.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s